The Positive Economic Impact of the Treatment Industry and Recovery Community

October 17, 2017

The health care industry is the job engine of many parts of the U.S., aided by funding as a result of the Affordable Care Act.

Florida, California, Texas, and other states are no different, specifically and including the number of well-paying jobs for professionals and para-professionals in the drug and alcohol treatment industry.

While some cities would prefer not to have treatment providers and recovery residences in their jurisdiction, that really cutting off the proverbial nose to spite one’s face.

We don’t have the numbers (yet) but no one will doubt the major economic driver that the treatment and housing industry is for the South Florida region.

According to a newly-released report by the New York Times in relation to Republican efforts to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act:

“Whatever happens, the economy of every state will be affected. Across the country, the health care industry has become a ceaseless job producer — for doctors, nurses, paramedics, medical technicians, administrators and health care aides. Funding that began flowing in 2012 as a result of the Affordable Care Act created at least a half-million jobs, according to an analysis by Goldman Sachs.”.

Similarly, universities such as Florida Atlantic, University of Miami, and Nova Southeastern, that have strong social work and other behavioral clinical programs, rely upon the robust treatment industry and recovery community for employment for their graduating students.

An economic impact review by the American Hospital Association concluded that workers’ earnings combined with their spending on groceries, clothing and the like generate millions of dollars per year in economic activity and helped create thousands of jobs beyond their own. “The goods and services hospitals purchase from other businesses create additional economic value for the community. With these “ripple effects” included, each hospital job supports about two additional jobs, and every dollar spent by a hospital supports roughly $2.30 of additional business activity.”

Similar results apply to the robust treatment and housing industry within Palm Beach County and throughout Florida, as well as the rest of the nation.

In the effort to regulate the treatment and housing industry, we have used chemotherapy to rid the scourge of bad players from the playing field. However, in doing so, we may have found that many good providers have been scared off too, fearful that regulators and law enforcement are using this is a pre-text at the behest of the electorate, where one may be able to “beat the rap” but will be unable to “beat the ride.”

In the meantime, recognition of the positive economic benefit that this industry has on Florida and the entire nation should be further studied, recognized, and supported.

The alternative is to eliminate the entire system, and to leave those suffering with no alternatives whatsoever.

Jeffrey Lynne

Jeffrey Lynne

Jeffrey C. Lynne is a South Florida native, representing individuals and business entities relating to licensing, accreditation, regulatory compliance, business structure, marketing, real estate, zoning and litigation pertaining to substance abuse treatment facilities and sober living residences. Mr. Lynne has been recognized across the region as a leader in progressive public dialogue about the role that substance abuse treatment has within our communities and the fundamental need and right to provide safe and affordable housing for those who are both in treatment for addiction and alcoholism as well as those who are established in their recovery.
Jeffrey Lynne

About Jeffrey Lynne

Jeffrey C. Lynne is a South Florida native, representing individuals and business entities relating to licensing, accreditation, regulatory compliance, business structure, marketing, real estate, zoning and litigation pertaining to substance abuse treatment facilities and sober living residences. Mr. Lynne has been recognized across the region as a leader in progressive public dialogue about the role that substance abuse treatment has within our communities and the fundamental need and right to provide safe and affordable housing for those who are both in treatment for addiction and alcoholism as well as those who are established in their recovery.

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