Tag Archives: Florida

Survey on SUD Disqualifying Offenses from Employment

Dear friends:

Please take a brief moment to complete this 3-question survey if you have ever been arrested in the past and have attempted to obtain employment within the Substance Use Disorder treatment and/or Recovery Residence fields.

https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RWFPHDW

The Florida Alcohol and Drug Abuse Association (FADAA) [yes, they will be changing their name to get with the times] has been working vigorously for many years now trying to update Florida’s Level 2 background screening and the exemption process.

This background check is required to hold many positions within the SUD treatment space. It also disparately impacts the ability of those with significant real world experience from getting involved.

However, DCF does have an exemption from disqualification process, recognizing that by excluding someone who committed a crime as a result of their active drug misuse, this would undermine the entirety of the effectiveness of the system.

The Florida Legislation is reviewing whether to exclude some drug charges from the disqualification matrix, so that after a period of time, there is an automatic exemption from disqualification, rather than having to go through the lengthy and expensive exemption application process, which tends to discourage good, rehabilitated people from providing their wisdom to the treatment marketplace.

Questions have been posted as to the 8 most common offenses for individuals seeking to work in this arena.

In order to try to give them this information, we have created a very short 3-question survey to gather this information anonymously.Here is the link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RWFPHDW

We are trying to gather all information before the end of this week.

YOUR NAME OR ANY IDENTIFYING INFORMATION WILL NOT BE SHARED AND WILL BE KEPT ENTIRELY CONFIDENTIAL.

We very much appreciate your time and quick response!

Negative Press Causing Referrals to Florida to Come Into Question

The Portland Press Herald reported on July 19, 2017 in the article “Operation Hope stops sending clients out of New England for opioid addiction treatment” about how the Scarborough (Maine) Police Department’s Operation Hope has stopped sending clients out of New England for treatment for opioid addiction, largely because of negative media about alleged unscrupulous programs, especially in Florida (a story published in May by STAT, a health journalism website that partners with The Boston Globe, detailed alleged insurance scams and referrals to Florida clinics where patients were receiving little or no treatment).

Launched in 2015, Operation Hope was conceived as a way for police to channel addicts who sought help into a treatment program as an alternative to criminal prosecution on drug-related charges.

In most cases, getting help from Operation Hope meant flying out of state – to Florida or one of eight other states – because Maine lacked treatment opportunities. In the program’s first six months, four out of five Operation Hope participants headed out of Maine, mostly to clinics in Florida, Arizona and Massachusetts.

“We always wanted to help people closer to home, but we really had no other choice. That was the only way to get people help,” said Steve Cotreau, program manager at Portland Community Recovery Center. The nonprofit social support center for people in recovery has helped with Operation Hope placements.

With the current black-and-white approach that many law enforcement agencies are taking with regard to “regulation” of treatment providers, many good providers are electing to close up shop due to lack of regulatory guidance. When the only guidance available is a knock at the door from a detective claiming you have violated the law, when the lawyers themselves may disagree whether the law was violated, but it is to be “left up to the judge and jury” to determine one’s fate, many good providers are simply walking away.

There is an absolute vacuum of publicly-funded beds in Florida, and nationally. Even when there is some modicum of availability, these facilities are generally not accessible to persons who do not qualify as being impoverished, and are often staffed by persons who lack the experience or education to be administering what is becoming an overwhelmingly medical modality.

The ignorance from the regulatory bodies about how the private sector must be allowed to work is impeding innovation as well as necessary investment in technologies for growth. A truly progressive society would stop complaining and fully support the treatment industry altogether.

The apparent restriction of prosecutorial discretion for purposes of achieving popular political gains is not only short-sighted, but also has a significant negative impact upon the substantial legitimate employment that the industry provides, along with choking off the ancillary revenue that local businesses experience from developing recovery communities.

We will simply go from one crisis, to another.