Tag Archives: purpose

Recommitting to the Mission

Dear Friends and Subscribers:

First, Happy Holidays to all. This is my favorite time of year, mostly because this is when the new Star Wars movies come out.

But it is also a time of reflection, appreciation, gratitude, and recommitting ourselves to your own life’s purpose and mission.

As we all move into 2018, while the treatment and recovery residence business communities have taken their unfair share of lumps in the press (since it is widely accepted as fact that far more good comes from the Recovery Business Community, than bad), we must continue to press on to change the narrative that people with Substance Use Disorders are not second-class/disposable human beings; that while “recovery” may begin in treatment, it is only fully realized in a supportive recovery community setting; and that we are all in this together – the afflicted, the first responders, citizens, government officials, parents, normies, lawyers, doctors, legislators, DCF, AHCA, DOH, and on and on.

But to that point of “recommitment of purpose,” I must admit a rather large failing that I have. I tend to want to see only the good in people and therefore tend to trust more than perhaps I should.

I have been deceived, actually lied to, manipulated, and used as a tool by clients who (I came to learn too late), never really wanted to heal our nation, but rather whose sole and exclusive purpose was to make money off of the pain.

That said, if I was ever to get a tattoo, it would say “It’s ok to do ‘well’ by doing ‘good’.”

I am a firm believers that profit motivation drives innovation, creativity, and the new discoveries that have always made our state and nation the greatest place on Earth.

I fully, 100%, support the private sector as the solution to getting our way out of this addiction crisis, which is far beyond a public health emergency. It is a national crisis that simply shows no sign of receding. It may sadly become to new “normal,” much like mass gun shootings in malls, movie theaters, churches, and schools.

However, and lately, I find myself getting worn down from it all. I become, admittedly, cranky. I become cantankerous. I become distrustful. I become jaded. I become angry and mean and resentful.

Then I am reminded of that saying attributed to the Buddhist faith that: “Holding onto anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.”

Maybe I missed out by not being addicted and going through recovery.

I find that those friends who have had to endure the life crucible of addiction and recovery to be at a different and oftentimes better place that I am. And very likely the reason why the Recovery Community is the best “community” that I have ever encountered in my lifetime as a native third-generation South Floridian.

As the New Year and holidays are upon us, I wish each of you nothing but the best and only ask in return that you, too, recommit yourself to the purpose and mission and privilege of working with and among these most exceptional people.